Tag Archives: cohabitating

Strengthening prevention and early intervention services for families into the future

A recent report commissioned by Family and Relationships Services Australia (FRSA) titled Strengthening prevention and early intervention services for families into the future, investigates the current and future potential for the Family and Relationships Services sector to take a greater prevention and early intervention approach in service delivery.

Many of the health and social problems Australia currently faces are preventable. The report aims to initiate a discussion as to how a coordinated strategy to increase family-based prevention and early intervention services could be utilised in Australia to prevent priority health and social problems. The report was completed by consulting expert opinions and drawing upon key policy documents, prior reviews and published sources.

Eight priority health and social problems were identified based on evidence that they have a preventable component through the delivery of family and relationship services:

  1. substance abuse (costing at least $55bn annually
  2. antisocial behaviour (including violence and crime, costing $36Bn, with family violence contributing between $22 and 26Bn in 2015–16)
  3. Obesity ($21Bn)
  4. Mental illness ($8.5Bn in 2014–15; up $911 million from 2010–11)
  5. Developmental injury (e.g., foetal alcohol problems, child neglect and abuse leading to preventable disability)
  6. Chronic illness (including preventable Type 2 diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, allergies)
  7. School failure (including leaving school and not participating in further education) and
  8. Social exclusion (lack of meaningful and constructive social and economic participation).

Source: Toumbourou, J., Hartman, D., Field, K., Jeffery, R., Brady, J., Heaton, A., Ghayour-Minaie, M., Heerde, J. (2017). Strengthening prevention and early intervention services for families into the future. Deakin University and FRSA

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE >

https://frsa.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/FRSA-Research-Report-Printable.pdf

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    The Couple Checkup generates deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations restore insight and understanding about one another. The Couple Checkup can help to revive a relationship and increase intimacy. 

    The Couple Checkup is an online couple assessment based on the PREPARE/ENRICH couple inventories. The Checkup assessment and Checkup report are designed to go directly to couples at any stage of their relationship (dating, engaged or married). The online system allows for dynamic customization of the assessment to each couple based on how the couple answers background questions. The goal is for the Couple Checkup to reach a more diverse group of couples, to empower couples to deal with issues on their own and to emphasize prevention over remediation.

    For more information on the use and analysis of the Couple Checkup or to simply use the tool, please contact: www.couplecheckup.com.au or call today (02) 9520 4049 #couplecheckup #strongerrelationships

    The cost of family breakdown: The burden on society, the impact on our children and the impact on government funding to support families in crisis is significant.

    Marriage is not for everyone. But for those that seek successful marriage and a fulfilling family life in which to raise healthy and happy children, functional families are seen as the bedrock of successful societies. But whilst attempted by many, many fail.
    In 2015 there were 118,962 marriages in Australia down from 123,244 in 2011, with 72% being a first marriage and 28% a remarriage, with brides aged 29 and grooms 34, with 73% conducted by a marriage celebrant, with the remaining 27% by a religious organisation. The average length of marriage increased from 10.7 years in 1993 to 12.1 years in 2015 with the median age of divorce females 42.9 and 47 for males however there is estimated to be 2/3 of marriages that are unhappy after 5 years. And remarriages didn’t fair any better, with a greater proportion more likely to divorce than those who had not been previously married.

    De facto partnering should not be excluded from discussion as many of the attributes and impact to society are prevalent in this cohort also. ABS stats suggest that 4 in 5 couples live together before marriage however research suggests that cohabitation is usually associated with lower levels of martial satisfaction and whilst two thirds of people are partnered, cohabiting has increased to 9.5% with those in married households 50%. One-parent households make up 16% of all households.

    The Cost of Family Breakdown

    The burden on society, the impact on our children and the impact on government funding to support families in crisis is significant. In Kevin Andrews book ‘Maybe I do’, he claims that >$3 billion p.a. was spent on social security benefits associated with marriage dysfunction in the 1990’s. That figure is a lot larger today. In the UK, the cost to the economy of family breakdown has been estimated at £47 billion (Ashcroft, J. 2015).

    In Australia 31% of children aged 0-17 met with their separated parent on a daily/weekly basis whereas, 51% of children did not spend a single night with their non-resident parent and one in four children saw the parent they were not living with less than once a year or never. According to 2011 census data, almost 1 in 5 families were headed by a single parent.

    An investment focussed on preventing marriage breakdown and developing relationship skills to assist with the success of your relationship is important, for you and your partner and society.
    References:

    • Ashcroft, J. (2015) Counting the Cost of Family Failure, 2015 Update. Relationships Foundation, Cambridge.
    • Benson, H 2013: The myth of “long-term stable relationships outside marriage”, The Marriage Foundation, May, extrapolated from Census and ONS data.
    • Rhoades, G. K., Stanley, S. M., Markman, H. J. 2006: Pre-engagement cohabitation and gender asymmetry in marital commitment. Journal of Family Psychology, 20(4), 553-560

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    Take the Couple Checkup

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Simply click on the Register button below relevant to your relationship – it couldn’t be easier. Once you have finished the questions you should receive your comprehensive personalised report in about 30 seconds.

    Take the Couple Checkup

    The Couple Checkup generates deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations restore insight and understanding about one another. The Couple Checkup can help to revive a relationship and increase intimacy. 

    The Couple Checkup is an online couple assessment based on the PREPARE/ENRICH couple inventories. The Checkup assessment and Checkup report are designed to go directly to couples at any stage of their relationship (dating, engaged or married). The online system allows for dynamic customization of the assessment to each couple based on how the couple answers background questions. The goal is for the Couple Checkup to reach a more diverse group of couples, to empower couples to deal with issues on their own and to emphasize prevention over remediation.

    For more information on the use and analysis of the Couple Checkup or to simply use the tool, please contact: www.couplecheckup.com.au or call today (02) 9520 4049 #couplecheckup #relationship

    The fastest growing family type is the cohabiting family but it is the least stable: The myth of long-term stable relationships outside marriage

    The trend away from traditional marriage is driving the increase in family breakdown. The fastest growing family type in the UK is the cohabiting family which has grown by 30% since 2004 but is the least stable.

    In Australia the rates of living together without marrying appears to have increased by one to three percentage points across each Census year since 1971, reaching 16% in 2011.

    Every year in the UK, 215,000 children will see their parents split up. Of the 47% of children born today outside of marriage, only 11% will reach 16 with their families intact. 83% of babies live with both parents, of whom 65% are married. By the time children are 15 only 53% live with both parents, of whom 93% are married.

    In Australia there are >46 thousand divorces, with almost 22 thousand involving children under 18 years of age (or 47% of all divorces), with an average of 1.8 child per divorce. In 2013, almost 42 thousand children experienced the divorce of their parents.

    The Marriage Foundations Harry Benson in “The myth of long-term stable relationships outside marriage”, claims the key factor is marital status at birth: couples who are married are far more likely to stay together than those who marry later or remain unmarried.

    If marriage is an intentional, public act of commitment, then cohabiting couples who drift into cohabitation and drift into shared financial responsibilities are much more likely to separate. The failure to marry is often the decision of only one partner, and their unwillingness fully to commit destabilises the relationship from the outset (Rhoades, Stanley, and Markman: 2006).
    References:

    • Ashcroft, J. (2015) Counting the Cost of Family Failure, 2015 Update. Relationships Foundation, Cambridge.
    • Benson, H 2013: The myth of “long-term stable relationships outside marriage”, The Marriage Foundation, May, extrapolated from Census and ONS data.
    • Rhoades, G. K., Stanley, S. M., Markman, H. J. 2006: Pre-engagement cohabitation and gender asymmetry in marital commitment. Journal of Family Psychology, 20(4), 553-560

    More tips at Intentional-Relationship.com

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Simply click on the Register button below relevant to your relationship – it couldn’t be easier. Once you have finished the questions you should receive your comprehensive personalised report in about 30 seconds.

    Take the Couple Checkup

    The Couple Checkup generates deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations restore insight and understanding about one another. The Couple Checkup can help to revive a relationship and increase intimacy. 

    The Couple Checkup is an online couple assessment based on the PREPARE/ENRICH couple inventories. The Checkup assessment and Checkup report are designed to go directly to couples at any stage of their relationship (dating, engaged or married). The online system allows for dynamic customization of the assessment to each couple based on how the couple answers background questions. The goal is for the Couple Checkup to reach a more diverse group of couples, to empower couples to deal with issues on their own and to emphasize prevention over remediation.

    For more information on the use and analysis of the Couple Checkup or to simply use the tool, please contact: www.couplecheckup.com.au or call today (02) 9520 4049 #couplecheckup #relationship

    What Do the “Haves” Have, That the “Have-Not’s” Have Not?

    Inequality is on the rise in the Western world. It is often measured by a number of factors such as: inequality in wealth, income and employment opportunities, in education, in health, and in access to health care and other resources, in human capital, in intergenerational mobility, etc…

    Yet one important factor is less-often considered: family inequality. Yet family inequality is entwined with inequalities of class, both feeding them and being fed by them.

    The Social Trends Institute invited professors and scholars of law, sociology, economics, public policy, demography and political economy to an experts meeting in Rome to present new research on these intersections.

    The findings were interesting, with study after study revealing family instability to be detrimental to children’s welfare. Many demonstrate that family structure polarization, perpetuates and even exaggerates the cycles on both ends of the scale. For example:

    • University of Virginia’s Brad WilcoxJoseph Price from Brigham Young addressed how family structure impacts economic growth, highlighting that countries with higher levels of two-parent families and marriage enjoy higher levels of economic growth.
    • Brienna Perrelli-Harris’ research highlighted some differences in the American and European cases. While her findings were the same as others that, for example, cohabitating unions are less stable than marriages, she noted that these differences were significantly greater in the US and the UK than in other countries. She also noted that country context matters more for partnership patterns than does education.

    Source: www.socialtrendsinstitute.org/

    Read more: www.socialtrendsinstitute.org/news/v/en/news/n1835/what-do-the-haves-have-that-the-have-not-s-have-not 

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    Take the Couple Checkup

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Simply click on the Register button below relevant to your relationship – it couldn’t be easier. Once you have finished the questions you should receive your comprehensive personalised report in about 30 seconds.

    Take the Couple Checkup

    The Couple Checkup generates deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations restore insight and understanding about one another. The Couple Checkup can help to revive a relationship and increase intimacy. 

    The Couple Checkup is an online couple assessment based on the PREPARE/ENRICH couple inventories. The Checkup assessment and Checkup report are designed to go directly to couples at any stage of their relationship (dating, engaged or married). The online system allows for dynamic customization of the assessment to each couple based on how the couple answers background questions. The goal is for the Couple Checkup to reach a more diverse group of couples, to empower couples to deal with issues on their own and to emphasize prevention over remediation.

    For more information on the use and analysis of the Couple Checkup or to simply use the tool, please contact: www.couplecheckup.com.au or call today (02) 9520 4049 #couplecheckup #relationship

    UK: couples who are married are far more likely to stay together than those who marry later or remain unmarried.

    A marriage is an intentional, public act of commitment, but cohabiting couples often drift into cohabitation and drift into shared financial responsibilities. They are much more likely to separate because the failure to marry is often the decision of only one partner, and their unwillingness fully to commit destabilises the relationship from the outset (Rhoades, Stanley, and Markman: 2006).

    The trend away from traditional marriage is driving the increase in family breakdown. The fastest growing family type in the UK is the cohabiting family which has grown by 30% since 2004 but is the least stable.

    In Australia the rates of living together without marrying appears to have increased by one to three percentage points across each Census year since 1971, reaching 16% in 2011.

    Family stability is vital for children and as the marriage Foundations Harry Benson claims in “The myth of long-term stable relationships outside marriage”, the key factor for family stability is marital status at birth: couples who are married are far more likely to stay together than those who marry later or remain unmarried.

    Cohabitation is less likely to deliver such family stability to children, compared to marriage and as the American expert on family and marriage Professor Brad Wilcox said: “We know that children thrive on stable routines with stable caregivers.

    References:

    • Ashcroft, J. (2015) Counting the Cost of Family Failure, 2015 Update. Relationships Foundation, Cambridge.
    • Benson, H 2013: The myth of “long-term stable relationships outside marriage”, The Marriage Foundation, May, extrapolated from Census and ONS data.
    • Rhoades, G. K., Stanley, S. M., Markman, H. J. 2006: Pre-engagement cohabitation and gender asymmetry in marital commitment. Journal of Family Psychology, 20(4), 553-560

    More tips at Intentional-Relationship.com

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Take the Couple Checkup

    Simply click on the Register button below relevant to your relationship – it couldn’t be easier. Once you have finished the questions you should receive your comprehensive personalised report in about 30 seconds.

    Take the Couple Checkup

    The Couple Checkup generates deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations restore insight and understanding about one another. The Couple Checkup can help to revive a relationship and increase intimacy. 

    The Couple Checkup is an online couple assessment based on the PREPARE/ENRICH couple inventories. The Checkup assessment and Checkup report are designed to go directly to couples at any stage of their relationship (dating, engaged or married). The online system allows for dynamic customization of the assessment to each couple based on how the couple answers background questions. The goal is for the Couple Checkup to reach a more diverse group of couples, to empower couples to deal with issues on their own and to emphasize prevention over remediation.

    For more information on the use and analysis of the Couple Checkup or to simply use the tool, please contact: www.couplecheckup.com.au or call today (02) 9520 4049 #couplecheckup #relationship