Tag Archives: children

Cohabitation in Middle and Later Life is becoming more popular

Cohabitation is gaining popularity across the life course. In the US, the 2014 American Community Survey found that the number of older men and women (defined as those aged 50 and older) in a cohabiting relationship was about 1.2 million (or 1.6% of older adults). Since then, the number of cohabiting older adults has nearly tripled to 3.2 million in 2014 (Brown, Bulanda, & Lee, 2005).

The study also found that for the population of cohabitors aged 50 or older, they were younger, on average, than their married and single counterparts; the average age of cohabitors was 60 compared to 67 and 63 for single and married individuals, respectively.

In Australia, marriage has fallen progressively from 58% in 1986 to 49% in 2011. The proportion of marriages has fallen in all age groups up to and including 65–69 years. The decrease among Australians aged 50–54 years and 55–59 years has been greatest — more than 3% since 2006, and 7% since 2001.

In 1975, just 16% of marriages were preceded by cohabitation however by 2016, 81% of marriages took place after the couple had lived together.

According to the latest census data – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016 – Marriages where both partners were marrying for the first time accounted for 72.3% of all marriage in 2016. The number of marriages where one partner was marrying for the first time decreased by 0.3 percentage points to 16.0% in 2016, while the proportion of remarriages for both partners increased from 11.7% in 2015 to 11.8% in 2016.

The proportion of adults living with a partner has declined during the last two decades, from 65% in 1986, to 61% in 2006. Factors such as the trend towards partnering at a later age, and the increased financial and social independence of women, may be associated with this decline, as well as legal changes in recent decades which have improved access to divorce” (ABS, 2009).

While cohabitation is most prevalent among young people, the US experience and census data suggests that cohabitation is becoming an increasingly common experience among older Australians also.

Source:

  • Australian Bureau of Statistics 2016: Marriage and divorces, Australia
  • Australian Bureau of Statistics 2009: 4102.0 – Australian Social Trends, March
  • Brown, Bulanda, & Lee, 2005: National Center for Family & Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University.

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

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Cohabitation is gaining popularity across the life course

According to the latest census data – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016 – couples who lived together prior to marriage accounted for 80.8% of all marriages registered in 2016, an increase from the 76.1% recorded in 1996. In 1975, just 16% of married couples had lived together first, and by 1981 cohabitation had doubled with 31% of married couples recording their pre-marriage cohabitation.

Whilst cohabitation has become popular, these relationships tend to be of short duration and this changing landscape raises complex and competing factors for cohabiting parents.

According to the Australian Family Formation Project, 25% of de facto relationships lasted 12 months, around half ended after two years, and three quarters ended by four years. Many also end in marriage.

According to recent research by Smyth, Hunter, Macvean, Walter & Higgins (2017), the research reveals:

  • For Children, a significant proportion (34%) are born out of wedlock
  • 1/5 of all children have a parent living elsewhere.

Such growth suggests that cohabitation is becoming an increasingly common experience among people today.

Source:

  • National Center for Family & Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University
  • Smyth, B., & Higgins, D. (2017, 23 Nov). Education for Family Life in Australia: A recent snapshot. Presentation at Marriage and Relationship Educators Association of Australia Conference 2017. Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre: 22-23 November

Read more: https://magic.piktochart.com/output/16793753-hemez-brown-cohabitation-middle-later-life-2014-fp-16-20_w

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

Married families still tend – on average – to do better: The UK Marriage Foundation found

The results of their recent study, which you can download from the Marriage Foundation website, are extraordinary. Regardless of family and social background, those born to married parents were:

  • 23% more likely to have been to university
  • 10% more likely to have got married, and
  • 16% less likely ever to have received government benefits

Having richer parents also made no difference in the probability of ever needing to go on welfare if those parents weren’t initially married.

To marry before starting a family is more likely to create a stable family setting, more likely to help children go through to higher education and ultimately make children more financially resilient. This is such a simple and great gift to bestow on the next generation.

Source: Marriage Foundation.

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

Cohabitation provides a test for marriage

“Majority of Americans Now Believe in Cohabitation.” That’s the headline and conclusion from a national survey conducted by the Barna Group.

They surveyed 1,097 adults in April 2016, finding that 65 percent of Americans now approve of cohabiting prior to tying the knot, while 35 percent do not.

Given that nearly 70 percent of Americans marrying today will cohabit before getting married, these findings are not too surprising. The Barna Group also found that 84 percent of those who support premarital cohabitation do so because it provides a test of compatibility prior to marrying.

In Australia the figures are very similar or higher in the case of cohabitation before marriage. According to the latest census data – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016, couples who lived together prior to marriage accounted for 80.8% of all marriages registered in 2016, an increase from the 76.1% recorded in 1996. In 1975, just 16% of married couples had lived together first, and by 1981 cohabitation had doubled with 31% of married couples recording their pre-marriage cohabitation.

In the US study, findings from the report include:

  • Millennials are more likely (72%) to endorse cohabitation prior to marriage than the older generation (36%).
  • Those identifying as liberal are more likely (86%) to endorse cohabitation prior to marriage than those identifying as conservative (37%).
  • Those identifying as more religious, particularly those who report being practicing Christians, are the least likely (41%) to endorse cohabiting before marriage while those reporting no faith at all are the most likely to embrace cohabitation (88%).

Source:

  • Australian Bureau of Statistics – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016
  • Stanley, S,. and Rhoades, G., 2016: Testing a Relationship Is Probably the Worst Reason to Cohabit @DECIDEORSLIDE

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

Parents are less likely to be married than in the past

According to the latest census data – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016, couples who lived together prior to marriage accounted for 80.8% of all marriages registered in 2016, an increase from the 76.1% recorded in 1996. In 1975, just 16% of married couples had lived together first, and by 1981 cohabitation had doubled with 31% of married couples recording their pre-marriage cohabitation.

Whilst cohabitation has become popular, the complex and changing landscape for cohabiting parents raises many competing factors to consider. According to the Australian Family Formation Project, 25% of de facto relationships lasted 12 months, around half ended after two years, and three quarters ended by four years. Many ended in marriage.

Such growth suggests that cohabitation is becoming an increasingly common experience among people today.

According to recent research by Smyth, Hunter, Macvean, Walter & Higgins (2017), the challenges for families and the complex and changing landscape for parents, there are many competing factors to consider. The research reveals:

  • Parents are less likely to be married than in the past;
  • Parents are older before parenting children;
  • More are having fewer children in individual relationships;
  • More are having children in more than one relationship.

Download the full presentation here >

Source:

  • Australian Bureau of Statistics – Marriage and divorces, Australia 2016
  • National Center for Family & Marriage Research, Bowling Green State University

Read more: https://magic.piktochart.com/output/16793753-hemez-brown-cohabitation-middle-later-life-2014-fp-16-20_w

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

The inertia of cohabitation: a couple who is cohabiting will have a harder time breaking up than a couple who is only dating

Cohabiting relationships break up all the time, and increasingly so, but the relative difference is the point. All other things being the same, a couple who is cohabiting will have a harder time breaking up than a couple who is only dating.

Because many people cohabit before even having mutual clarity about commitment, such as through engagement or marriage, some people end up staying in relationships, including on into marriage, that they otherwise would have left behind.

Many people slide into situations that make it harder to end a relationship before they have made a clear decision about what is best. The situation looks quite a bit different for those who have strongly clarified mutual commitment to the future before moving in together, such as by being engaged or even—gasp—being married.

Reference: Testing a Relationship Is Probably the Worst Reason to Cohabit by Scott Stanley.

Scott M. Stanley is a research professor at the University of Denver and fellow of the Institute for Family Studies (@DecideOrSlide). Galena K. Rhoades is a research associate professor at the University of Denver.

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au

This “success sequence” – high school, marriage, and only then baby carriage – holds true today

This “success sequence” – high school, marriage, and only then baby carriage – holds true today, where women are three times more likely to have babies out of wedlock than three wealthier peers. Poor women are five times more likely than wealthy women to have babies outside marriage. Both poor and middle class women are twice as likely to be cohabiting than their richer sisters (McLean, D.C., 2017).

Marriage has a “extraordinary economic power,” Stanton wrote. “It boosts every important measure of well-being for women, children and men.” That includes income, health, savings, employment, educational success, happiness, recovery from serious illness – even a healthy diet.

Marriage creates wealth because marriage encourages partners to become better, more committed workers, providers and savers. Men particularly are less likely to fall into substance abuse, and are less likely either to commit or fall victim to crime, they have better health and they’re even less accident-prone.

Source: McLean, D.C., 2017: Research proves social conservatives right: Marriage helps families escape poverty.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE >

www.lifesitenews.com/news/reseach-proves-social-conservatives-right-marriage-helps-families-out-of-po

Do you need help with an issue or problem? Our approach helps to generate deep and productive conversations that couples would not otherwise have about their relationship. These conversations can restore insight and understanding about one another.

Tune in for more tips next week… or contact me Shane Smith shane@intentional-relationship.com or @ www.workofheart.net.au