Alcohol and arguments

Alcohol is one of the main causes of conflict between partners. According to research by travel agency ebookers.com, over a quarter (26%) of British women blame alcohol for any arguments they have with their partners while on holiday. But while it’s important for couples to air their issues from time to time, arguing after drinking rarely leads to constructive problem solving. To try and stop these conflicts arising, here are a few tips: Talk about your problems when sober. Break the routine. If routine dictates that you and your partner get through a bottle of wine most evenings, why not break from it and cut back a little? Go for a walk, to the cinema or to the gym together. Eat while drinking. Food can slow down the rate your body absorbs alcohol. If you don’t want to cut alcohol out of your diet, make sure you drink responsibly.

More tips at Intentional-Relationship.com

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2 thoughts on “Alcohol and arguments

  1. Clark Kent

    If you drink, smoke, etc.. are you just doing something to cover up a pain that is already in place. It’s like being in a new relationship it creates a drug like effect that causes the same very pain you carry inside you to be dormant till at some point all the symptoms will need to be taken to the root. If you chose alcohol then this would make sense and will also cause the episodes. Slowing the cycle or allowing the cycle to be removed will only allow this effect to continue until something is embraced about what is stemming from the experiences that cause this to happen! Shouldn’t that be what needs to be in place to heal these types of things?

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    1. intentionalrelationship Post author

      Whilst using alcohol (and other substances) to cope is common, it is never a long term solution. Then bring a partner into the equation, and it’s not only the drinker who has the problem, the attachment to alcohol becomes part of the relationship. Whilst support from the partner is key, support from a support network or a third party organisation like Alcoholics Anonymous can help. If deeper therapy is necessary, seek help. It can be a long road but its worth it.

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